An update on diversity and belonging progress at Airbnb

Key Takeaways

  • As a new step to drive progress toward our diversity goals, we are now including diversity and belonging as a measure for executive compensation.
  • New employee diversity data shows our company continues to become more diverse. As of June 30, 2022, the percentage of US Airbnb employees who identified as underrepresented minorities reached its highest number since we started collecting this information in 2014.

Key Takeaways

  • As a new step to drive progress toward our diversity goals, we are now including diversity and belonging as a measure for executive compensation.
  • New employee diversity data shows our company continues to become more diverse. As of June 30, 2022, the percentage of US Airbnb employees who identified as underrepresented minorities reached its highest number since we started collecting this information in 2014.

Airbnb is committed to building a diverse workforce and inclusive culture, and we continue working to increase and sustain diverse representation across our company. To drive progress and hold ourselves accountable, we committed ourselves in 2020 to reach the following goals by the end of 2025:

  • 20 percent of US employees will identify as underrepresented minorities.
  • At every level, 50 percent of our global employees who identify in the gender binary will be women.

Today we are outlining the progress made toward these goals as well as the new steps we’re taking to help us reach them.

Executive compensation and diversity and belonging

As a new step, we are now including diversity and belonging as a criteria for executive compensation. Going forward, Airbnb’s executive team will have 10 percent of their annual equity refresh tied to performance against their teams’ respective diversity plans. Progress will be reported to our board of directors on a regular basis. 

Each executive team member has a diversity plan, reviewed regularly, that reflects the unique opportunities and challenges of their team. Each plan is based on the same components, which must have measurable goals and clearly identified owners, including:

  • Diverse representation goals for underrepresented groups: In addition to our company-wide goals, each organization has set goals to help grow our diverse workforce. 
  • Growth and development of underrepresented groups: Each organization has outlined clear and specific tactics to invest in, grow and retain employees who are part of underrepresented communities, with a specific focus on increasing diversity at leadership levels. 
  • Development plans for senior leaders: Each executive will ensure that all senior leaders1 on their teams have personalized development plans to help them to grow professionally.
  • Diversity and belonging learning: Team participation goals for diversity and belonging skill building activities, such as an attendance rate for our Blocking Bias and Allyship courses.  
  • Executive team ERG sponsorship: Every executive team member must sponsor one of Airbnb’s Airfinity Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) and must show active allyship, such as regularly attending group meetings.

An update on diversity and belonging at Airbnb

Today, we are also sharing an update on our workforce diversity. This data shows we continue to make progress, but we have more work to do to reach our long-term goals.

Our company continues to become more diverse. As of June 30, 2022, the population of US Airbnb employees who identified as underrepresented minorities (URM)2 was 15 percent, an increase of 1.7 percentage points over the same time last year, and the highest representation since we started collecting this information in 2014. 

We also continue to increase representation of employees in the gender binary who identify as women. Globally, the population of women at Airbnb increased to 48.3 percent as of June 30, up 1.1 percent over the last year. 

Additional details on the diversity of Airbnb employees are available here

Building diversity and belonging at Airbnb

We are committed to building on our progress. In addition to our new executive compensation plans, our new design for employees to Live and Work Anywhere provides greater opportunities for us to hire from a diverse pool of candidates not limited to the communities near our offices. We’ve opened our new Technical Hub in Atlanta, which is helping us tap into the diverse local talent pool and welcoming employees who prefer to work from an office. We also continue to foster diversity and belonging through a number of programs, including:  

  • Sharing base pay hiring ranges on job postings in the US, starting this year, to increase transparency. We plan to expand hiring range transparency to open roles based in certain countries outside the US in 2023.
  • Increasing transparency by sharing quarterly updates with employees about our performance on diversity, including updates on representation.
  • Conducting a pay equity analysis annually since 2015 to help support equal pay for equal work for all. In 2022, we closed our annual compensation review with no unexplained statistically-significant gaps in our annual salary and equity refresh grants. 
  • Using inclusive candidate slates, starting in 2017, focused on ensuring that  women globally and underrepresented minorities in the US are present on candidate slates when we hire for open roles.
  • Introducing a number of new voluntary identity fields for employees over the last two years, to help us better understand the diversity of our employees, so we can better support them. In the US, and newly launched in the UK and Ireland, our employees can share if they identify as a parent or caregiver, have a disability, and share their sexual orientation and gender identity. Employees in the UK and Ireland can now also share their race and ethnicity. Employees in Canada can now share their race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • Expanding our diversity and belonging learning programs to offer a new inclusive leadership training for senior leaders, focused on building connections across differences, and other skills.

1 Defined as Level 12 and above

2 Underrepresented minority is defined as individuals who identify as Black and/or African American, Hispanic or Latinx, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, American Indian or Alaska Native, and two or more races inclusive of URM. Race and ethnicity data is self-reported by employees, and Airbnb seeks to honor our employees’ self-identification. As such, employees who select more than one race/ethnicity category are counted in each category they select. For example, if an employee selects both “Black” and “Hispanic,” they are included in both categories. As a result, the total representation reflected in this table adds up to more than 100%. When reporting the overall population of Airbnb employees who identify as underrepresented minorities, however, each employee is counted only once.